How to solve all CV Writing problems

Monday, July 16th, 2012 - CV Writing, CV Writing UK


How to solve all

CV Writing problems

I’m sure that as a job seeker, you think that you are pretty unique. But I am also sure that like every other job seeker, you have a problem somewhere in your employment history, that is creating a CV Writing problem.

This CV Writing problem you currently conclude will mean that you are unemployed forever. So what’s the point in applying for a job, when you already know the answer: REJECTED!

Can I give you a thought? Somewhere, there is an employer who would love to employ you. You not only have the right skills, but the right attitude and approach that they seek. Now all we have to do is to find them, communicate your great personal fit to their employment opportunity, and then you start work.

CV Writing statistics

Why am I so confident that that you will get employed? Simply, statistics.

This post is probably best appreciated if you are travelling on public transport, where others are up close and personal to you, or sat in a public place with a lot of footfall like a coffee shop or a department store. Here’s the interesting statistics of those around you:

  • 49.5% will be male, and 50.5% female
  • 15% will be LGBT, a similar figure to those who are considered disabled
  • 25% will be under 25, and 33% over 65
  • 5% have served time in jail. In fact 0.02% won’t be there because they are in jail right now
  • 15% have committed and been convicted of a crime in a court
  • 65% of those who drive will have broken the law by breaking the speed limit today
  • The potential working population is at maximum 35%, but after excluding those in education and the civil service, that falls to around 25% (Yes, for every 1 working person in the commercial sector, there are 3 other people in the population)
  • On average, those working earn just over £26,000pa

Yet, the unemployed, even in these dark economic times, make up less than 3% of those people around you (8% of the potential working population).

That working population includes murderers, convicts, law breakers, and those with issues that include “differences” in their sexual choice or physical ability. Yet they still stand the same chance of employment.

Now true, certian people stand less chance of employment. Young black males and Asian females you thought, perhaps? No, the most discriminated against are women between the ages of 25 and their late 30’s, as the maternity laws now scare SME employers, who make up around half the potential jobs in the UK.

CV Writing is about communication

CV Writing, like all forms of writing, is about communication. But unlike writing a letter, there is a second edge to this form of communication: confirmation that you have the required skills, qualifications and experiences to do the job (Technical Fit).

Job application is a process of rejection up until the job interview, and then a process of confirmation and fit. So why add to the reasons for rejection – either stuff that is not relevant or negative – until you have confirmed Technical Fit? Just focus on what you have got that they want, and not a lot else.

CV Writing problems solved

Here is the process to solve all CV Writing problems:

  1. Always look at the problem from the employers view point. What would they like (Answer: always the best candidate who fits that job)
  2. Is the problem in the past? Employers don’t like unstable and ongoing issues, which can apply to everything from minor personal life problems and upwards
  3. Do you need to mention the issue in your Professional CV? Does adding it add or detract from your employability? Most personal issues never need to be mentioned
  4. Solve the timeline issue by being honest, but not fully open. It’s not uncommon at present for people to be job seeking for a long, long time. Secondly, many have been unsure what to do after a period of unemployment, or tried a number of things. Thirdly, no one does nothing, or everything 100% of the time – you must have done somethig, read something, or learnt something

Here is that simple solve-it in application…..

Solving your CV Writing problem

Susan, a job seeker, asks: Would you employ someone who had been out of work for a while due to illness? If so, what would you want them to write on their CV, e.g. should they put dates of previous employment on it which would make the break in employment more obvious? If not, what could the candidate do, apart from being better from the illness, to convince you that you should employ them?
In Answer:
If you are over your illness, and have been passed fit to work by your doctor in that type of job, then UK and EU regulations mean that you can not be discriminated against on those grounds.

There are also worse thing to try and over come than a solved and in the past illness: trying writing a CV for an ex-convict who is still on license (yes, I got them and others a job).

In all cases, the same system for any perceived employment problem works:

  1. Always look at the problem from the employers view point. What would they like (Always the best candidate who fits that job): If you are right for that job, then communicate that “why” over your illness – which actually does not need to be mentioned.
  2. Is the problem in the past? Employers don’t like unstable and ongoing issues, which can apply to everything from minor personal life problems and upwards, including illness. But if its solved medically and in the past, why mention it?
  3. Do you need to mention the issue? Does adding it to your CV add or detract from your employability? Most personal issues never need to be mentioned
  4. Solve the timeline issue by being honest, but not fully open: It’s not uncommon at present for people to be job seeking for a long, long time. Secondly, many have been unsure what to do after a period of unemployment, or tried a number of things. Thirdly, no one does nothing, or everything 100% of the time – you must have done something, read something, or learnt something – yes, even in a hospital bed. The question is, what? Communicate that, not the underlying and now resolved issue as to why (ie: your illness), unless it adds to your job application

In summary: don’t focus on your own personal negativity (ie: the solved medical issue), focus on why you are suitable for that job (technical fit), and communicate that.

Good Luck!

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