Interview Techniques – after the “I’m sorry” letter

Wednesday, February 11th, 2009 - interview techniques, job application rejection, job interview, tutorial


Job Interview

James, I think your cover's blown!
Creative Commons License photo credit: laverrue

Maz asks: I received a unsuccessful interview reply. I liked the company and I expected the job.Id like to reply?
I really like the company, and expected the job. I went for the interview after CV selection. The interview was very promising and I was more confident about getting the job. I was expected this kind of opportunity for a long time.
The interviewer send an email stating:

I’m sorry to say that you have been unsuccessful for this position. As outlined at the interview there were several applicants for the position and an alternative applicant’s skill-set and experience more closely matched our requirements. Please don’t be put off from applying for any other positions within (the company name) that you see. I would like to thank you for your time at the interview and wish you all the best in your search for employment.

I am very interested to reply for this email. How can I reply to him. Please help me. Thank you

In answer:

I am sorry to hear about your disappointment Maz. It’s always disappointing to be rejected, especially when you had so much confidence in yourself and the company.

The question is – what is the purpose of your need to reply?

  • If you’re interested in writing back to try to convince them to give you another try, then you have to accept that the eMail stated that another applicant was hired. The position is no longer open and available
  • If it is to through abuse at them, then forget it!

However, if your purpose is to improve your performance at your next interview – all applicants whether they get the job or are rejected, so ask for feedback – then there is purpose and gain in that for both parties.

I would write a simple and formal three paragraph letter:

  • Explain why you are writing – thank them for the interview and request feedback
  • Mention that it was a pleasure meeting everyone, and that as they expressed in their letter you hope to work with them in the future and to keep you in mind if a position opens that meets your skill-set
  • In the mean time, as a personal favour you would be appreciative of any feedback they can give you to help improve your next job application towards success

I bet if you go back in six months time and assuming you performed well at interview, that letter and you will still be in the HR managers mind. In the mean time, you will have gained valuable feedback – and probably a job.

Additional, in 1 in 10cases, the person they hired will be a bad fit and either quit or get fired within the first 90 days and you just might be their second choice. If they come calling, you can almost dictate your own terms.

Good Luck!

If you need help on improving your job application, use our Free CV Review service. If you need an interview winning solution, sign-up for our Professional CV service

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One Response to “Interview Techniques – after the “I’m sorry” letter”

  1. Sue Says:

    Good information! I wasn’t sure at first, but it turned out to be very useful. Thank You – Sue

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